Archives > May 2017

Simplifying Petunias

There is a plethora of petunias out there in the horticultural world and there is a lot confusion as to who they are and what they do.  

 

Let’s defrag, organize, and categorize some of the information available about petunias and attach some meaning to their labels.

 

First off, let’s talk about petunias in general.  They:

  • love sunny areas – east, south, and west facing
  • are great performers in hanging baskets, containers, and in-ground gardens
  • are easy to care for
  • can handle a significant amount of heat, once established
  • generally, do not need to be deadheaded, but if you are a deadheader, go ahead and cut  or pinch off the old blooms
  • like rich, well-drained soil
  • need daily watering if it is hot
  • need a significant amount of fertilizer to keep them going, they are heavy feeders
  • need to be fertilized with every watering or every other watering
  • recommended fertilizers:  ‘Nature’s Best’, 20-20-20, ‘Miracle Grow’, 10-52-10

 

Petunias are easy to breed – so bred they’ve been!  Some Petunias are wonderful in hanging baskets but are not that great as a landscaped flower.  This chart separates upright and trailing petunias.

 

Simplifying Petunias

 

Standard Upright Petunias:

This class of Petunia has an upright habit; they have a fairly conservative height & spread.  The differences between the series are generally the size of the blossoms. Dreams Grandiflora – meaning that their blossoms are large but they have a few less than the floribunda types

  • flower size: 3½”, plant height 10-12”, spread 10-12”
  • applications: great for gardens and some container applications

Madness Floribunda – meaning they have profuse flower power with slightly less flowers than grandiflora types

  • flower size: 3” flowers, plant height10-12”, spread 10-12”
  • applications: great for gardens, containers, mass plantings

Decorator – this series offers unique one of a kind flower colors not found in the above two series, can be considered ‘designer’.  Abundantly floriferous with a mounding habit.

  • flower size: 3½”, plant height: 10-15”, plant spread: 10-12”
  • applications:  great in containers & hanging baskets

Picobella – this is a series of mini petunias – they have very small flowers but they have many, many blossoms.  The color spectrum is large.

  • flower size:1½-2”, plant height: 10”, plant spread: 10”
  • applications: small hanging baskets & containers, small space gardens

Trailing Petunias:

This category of Petunia boasts of a huge selection of petunias with a trailing habit.  The differences between these series are related to how they trail.
Easy Wave – have great color options, get a little height as they grow

  • flower size: 2-3”, plant height: 6-12”, plant spread: 2.5-3.5’ yes, feet
  • applications:  great for hanging baskets, containers, and mass plantings

Wave – great color selection, these ones grow flat and spread far

  • flower size: 2-2½”, plant height: 5-7”, plant spread: 3-4 feet
  • applications:  great for landscaping & ass trailers in containers but not alone because they grow so flat, mass plantings and ground covers

Tidal Wave – again, great color options.  This series is referred to as a ‘hedgiflora’ because if grown close together, they produce significant height.

  • flower size: 2-2½”, plant height: 16-22”, plant spread: 2½-5 feet
  • applications: mass plantings, flower-filled ground covers

Shock Wave – consistently fresh looking flower show with slightly smaller flowers but more of them, a little shorter length than the others

  • flower size: 1½-2”, plant height: 7-10”, plant spread: 2.5-3 feet
  • applications: best for hanging baskets

Fuchsia Hanging Baskets Basket C-A-R-E

‘Sophisticated’ is the perfect adjective to describe Fuchsias. Fuchsias have delicate suspended flowers that look like ballerinas in the most intricate costumes.  They come in a huge selection of gorgeous ruffled blossoms.  Fuchsias like to grow in sheltered shady areas, so a full north, northwest and northeast location is best.  Fuchsias are fragile and will sustain damage by tearing or breaking in a windy area. Some people prefer to keep them in screened porches.

A fun thing about fuchsias is that hummingbirds are attracted to them.  We hope you get a visit!

We will do a quick review of general hanging basket care using the acronym C-A-R-E  and then look at Fuchsia hanging baskets specifically.

 

Check daily

  • This is about keeping a watchful eye on your hanging basket.
  • Each day, do a general top to bottom overall check of your hanging basket – inspect leaf & flower health:  any curling, wilting, spotted or yellowing leaves, and old or deformed flowers. Turn the leaves over to look underneath for bugs, they love hiding there.

Fuchsias

  • Fuchsias are delicate and require a caregiver that likes to pay attention to detail.  Stay vigilant; be in tune for small changes in the leaves indicating they need water.
  • Fuchsias have a tropical heritage, so remember that they hate to get cold.  Bring them indoors in the evenings when the temperature is threatening to go down to +10C or lower.  When they get chilled their leaves will droop, tricking people into thinking they need water when in actuality they’re just cold.
  • If the wind picks up and it gets stormy, it may be best to bring it indoors because the wind will damage or even snap off its branches.
  • Few pests are attracted to them. Because aphids are everywhere, keep an eye out for aphids. If that happens, an application of safer soap can really help keep them at bay.  You may also make homemade aphid spray from recipes found on the internet. As a last resort you may need to use insecticides, such as Dr. Doom specifically for aphids.

 

Adequate Hydration

    • This is all about watering.
    • A good way to check hanging baskets for adequate hydration is to feel how heavy they are, lift them a bit by pushing on the bottom of the pot as they are hanging to check the weight.  As you get more familiar with how heavy a fully watered hanging basket is, you will be able to tell when it’s time to water. If you happened to put your Fuchsia basket in an upright container, you can dip your index finger deeply into the soil.  If the soil is dry at about 1.5 inches, it’s time for a drink of water.  When watering containers and hanging baskets, water thoroughly so that water drains out of the bottom of the pot- that’s how you know you have watered effectively. If you don’t let water flow out, salts from the fertilizer will accumulate causing the leaves and flowers to burn.

Fuchsias

  • Fuchsias are sensitive about their watering.  They like to stay evenly moist at all times.  If they get too dry, they will wilt but if they are too wet, they will look droopy too.  Watch your Fuchsia to understand its rhythm and water it regularly and fairly often, like every 2 or 3 days depending on the weather.  If it is very hot outdoors, they may need to be watered twice a day.  When the weather is cooler, they need water less often.
  • Try to keep an eye out for when they are just beginning to wilt and then water gently and thoroughly so that the water just begins to drip out of the bottom of the pot.

 

 

Replenish Nutrients

  • This step is about fertilizing.  
  • Replenishing nutrients is important for containers and hanging baskets because there is a finite amount of nutrients held within the soil and when water drips out of the pots, some of those nutrients are lost.  We recommend fertilizing weekly.  Pick a regular day of the week, and make that your fertilizing day – make it an alarm on your phone.  Our favorite fertilizer is called ‘Nature’s Best’.  It is a natural fertilizer and we have found it to be easy to use, gentle on plants without burning and we think it makes flowers brighter.  ‘Miracle Grow’ is another good choice and other balanced fertilizers like20-20-20 work well.

Fuchsias

  • Fuchsias need regular weekly fertilizing as described above.  Best choices for fertilizer for fuchsias are ‘Nature’s Best’ and 20-20-20.

 

 

Encourage Growth

  • This is a maintenance step.  
  • Plant growth is encouraged by taking off old flowers, known as deadheading, removing dead leaves, and pinching straggly, leggy plants back.  Taking off old flowers is important because the ultimate purpose of flowers to produce seeds for reproduction. By taking off those dead flowers, the plant continues to flower.  Old wilted and curled leaves actually take energy from the plant in an attempt to repair itself but if they are removed, the plant can continue to focus its efforts on flowering.  Plants can also get long and straggly looking – it’s ok to literally give them a haircut with scissors – it will make them branch, become bushy and thrive.

Fuchsias

  • Fuchsias must be deadheaded to continue flowering.  Be sure to take off the green seed pod at the top end of the flower when you take the drying flower off.  If you don’t, the Fuchsia will continue to develop seeds in that pod and your Fuchsia will look like it is growing an impressive crop of green grapes.
  • Keep a few of the stems at the top of the Fuchsia basket pinched back to maintain a rounded top on the hanging basket.  If not, the top will flatten out – a phenomenon we call balding.
  • Also, don’t be afraid to clip back any branches that look straggly or if the Fuchsia is looking lopsided – it won’t hurt the Fuchsia – pinching them back will stimulate compact fresh growth.

Enjoy these baskets, they have tremendous color power and perform wonderfully when you care for them.  The extra effort will be worth it, especially if a hummingbird stops by!

Stressing Out:  Geranium Bud Death

Geraniums (aka Pelargoniums) are colorful, hardy, easy to grow, and well adapted to our Edmonton area climate; but at times they can be puzzling, especially in early spring when they start to abort their buds.  Let’s take a look at the causes of bud death and some things that can be done to remedy it.

Geraniums drop their buds due to stress.  If the plant is sensing that its life is in danger, it will focus its energy on preserving its own life rather than reproducing, so it sloughs its buds.  The buds get dry and turn brown. What kinds of things cause the stress?

Transplant shock

  • this is the most common stressor – when plants are taken from the greenhouse environment of controlled temperatures with regular watering and fertilization to outdoors, they need to adjust to their new surroundings
  • cool outdoor temperatures in the adjustment from the greenhouse
  • water them well after transplanting, we never recommend using root booster because we feel it is generally too strong for newly developing roots
  • avoid overwatering, keep them moderately moist
  • be patient, new bud growth should appear in about 2-3 weeks
  • fertilize weekly with a balanced fertilizer like 20-20-20 or ‘Nature’s Best’

Overwatering/high humidity

  • watering too frequently – avoid watering on a schedule, it is preferable that they are watered as they begin to get dry
  • soil that is too heavy & retaining moisture will result in an overwatered / over-wet scenario – change out the soil to a professional mix, avoid potting soil that is fertilizer-infused
  • too rainy – it’s just difficult to control the weather….

Inconsistent watering

  • occurs with high heat temperatures – again, avoid watering on a schedule –  keep geraniums moderately moist and check them regularly – not too wet, &  not too dry
  • fertilize weekly with a balanced fertilizer like 20-20-20 or ‘Nature’s Best’

Too shady

  • geraniums like to be in part to full sun, or in an east, south, or west exposure
  • geraniums like to have a minimum of 6 hours of sunshine, 8 is even better

 

Shade Begonia Hanging Basket C-A-R-E

Before speaking specifically about Begonia hanging baskets, let’s talk about the environment Begonias prefer.  Begonias – like Nonstop, Illumination, and Bossa Nova – like to grow in sheltered shady areas; so a full north, northwest and a north northwest location is best.  Begonias need a sheltered area because are a bit fragile and will get damaged or break in a windy area.

 

We will do a quick review of general hanging basket care using the acronym C-A-R-E and then we’ll take a detailed look at Begonia hanging baskets specifically.

Check daily

  • This is about keeping a watchful eye on your hanging basket.
  • Each day, do a general top to bottom overall check of your hanging basket – inspect leaf & flower health: any curling, wilting, spotted or yellowing leaves, and old or deformed flowers. Turn the leaves over to look underneath for bugs, they love hiding there.

Begonias

  • Begonias are quite hardy plants when they are in the proper location. You see problems arise when they are growing in areas that stress them (like in the sun).
  • One thing to be very diligent about is to check for stem rot.  If Begonias are kept too wet, their stems will rot at the soil level.  You can tell this by a yellowish-brown color where the soil and stem touch.  It will also be slimy at this area.  Yuck!

 

Adequate Hydration

  • This is all about watering.
  • A good way to check hanging baskets for adequate hydration is to feel how heavy they are, lift them by pushing up on the bottom of the pot as they are hanging and check the weight. As you get more familiar with how heavy a fully watered hanging basket is, you will be able to tell when it’s time to water. If you happened to put your begonia basket in an upright container, you can dip your index finger deeply into the soil.  If the soil is dry at about 1.5 inches, it’s time for a drink of water.  Water thoroughly so that water runs out of the bottom of the pot – that’s how you know you have watered effectively and that all the roots are bathed in a fresh drink of water. If you don’t let water flow out, salts from the fertilizer will accumulate causing the leaves and flowers to burn.

Begonias

  • Begonias die most often from overwatering. Because Begonias grow in the shade, their need for water is significantly lower than hanging baskets growing in the sun. Classically a Begonia doesn’t need to be watered any more often than once every 5 to 10 days – it sounds kind of crazy, but they easily last that long.  Be very sure to check the soil moisture or basket weight before you water.
  • Water gently and thoroughly so the water drains out the bottom as described above.

 

Replenish Nutrients

  • This step is about fertilizing.
  • Replenishing nutrients is important for containers and hanging baskets because there is a finite amount of nutrients held within the container soil and when water drips out of the pots, some of those nutrients are lost. We recommend fertilizing weekly.  Pick a regular day of the week, and make that your fertilizing day – make it an alarm on your phone.  Our favorite fertilizer is called ‘Nature’s Best’.  It is a natural fertilizer and we have found it to be easy to use, gentle on plants with no burning and we think it makes flowers brighter.  ‘Miracle Grow’ is another good choice and other balanced fertilizers like 20-20-20 work well.

Begonias

  • As a general guideline, fertilize Begonia hanging baskets weekly. If you are watering weekly or every 10 days, fertilize at that time. There is no need to fertilize more often.

 

Encourage Growth

  • This is a maintenance step.
  • Plant growth is encouraged by taking off old flowers, known as deadheading, removing dead leaves, and pinching straggly, leggy plants back. Taking off old flowers is important because the ultimate purpose of flowers to produce seeds for reproduction. By taking off those dead flowers, the plant continues to flower.  Old wilted and curled leaves actually take energy from the plant in an attempt to repair itself but if they are removed, the plant can continue to focus its efforts on flowering.  Plants can also get long and straggly looking – it’s ok to literally give them a haircut with scissors – it will make them branch, become bushy and thrive.

Begonias

  • Deadheaded Begonias as flowers begin to dry. Pinch out old flowers and seed pods by following the flower stem back to where it intersects with the larger stem and pinch it back at that point.
  • If the Begonias are getting long and gangly, pinch them back to keep them compact and to stimulate fresh growth.
  • If the Begonia basket is mixed with other stuffers and vines, some of the trailing flowers may need to be deadheaded as well.  If they get long, you can always cut them back with scissors to keep them stocky and strong, and to stimulate fresh growth.

 

Enjoy these baskets, they have tremendous color power and perform wonderfully with a little routine care.

How Annuals & Perennials Work Together  

Once the basic features of annuals and perennials are understood – check out this link to The Differences Between Annuals and Perennials – you can go forward with a strategy for building your garden.  Annuals and Perennials pair extremely well together.

 

Here are a few ideas:

  • choose a few spring, summer, and fall blooming perennials that are appropriate for your horticultural zone and for sun/shade exposure
  • remember that spring perennials kick start gardens with early color before annuals are established and begin blooming
  • check out this link to our blog on Fifteen Fab & Faithful Perennials on ideas for great perennials in the Edmonton area
  • because annuals bloom all summer long, they can work to pull a thread of color through as spring perennials wane in their bloom cycle and as summer perennials begin theirs
  • annuals can disguise a perennial dying back as our eyes are naturally drawn to vibrantly colored blossoms
  • in the autumn, as annuals wind down their life cycle and as leaves crunch under our feet, bold fall blooming perennials take their turn masking the fading annuals and extending the season of color deep into fall

 

Enjoy planning your garden and experimenting with what works in your garden space.  Remember that gardens are always a work in progress and always require ‘adjustments’ and fine tuning.

Mixed Geranium Hanging Basket C-A-R-E

 

Mixed Geranium hanging baskets come in a large variety of colors and are very hardy. All Geraniums thrive in warm sunny locations.  The label ‘mixed’ means that they have been paired with basket stuffers and vines that love sun too.  They need a minimum of 6 hours of sunshine, but prefer at least 8.  If they are grown in the shade, they tend to stretch because they are searching for more light and they will bloom poorly.  Of all the hanging basket types we grow, Geraniums are the easiest to care for.

 

Geraniums can take a little wind, but they aren’t fans of full force gale winds or perpetually windy areas.

 

Let’s do a quick review of general hanging basket care by using the acronym C-A-R-E and then we’ll take a look at Mixed Geranium hanging basket care specifically.

Check daily

  • This is about keeping a watchful eye on your hanging basket.
  • Each day, do a general top to bottom overall check of your hanging basket – inspect leaf & flower health:  any curling, wilting, spotted or yellowing leaves, and old or deformed flowers. Turn the leaves over to look underneath for bugs, they love hiding there.
  • Mixed Geraniums
    • Geraniums are robust plants when they are in the proper location.  When they are grown in areas that stress them (like in the shade), that is when you see problems arise.  

Adequate Hydration

    • This is all about watering.
    • A good way to check hanging baskets for adequate hydration is to feel how heavy they are, lift them by pushing up on the bottom of the pot as they are hanging and check the weight.  As you get more familiar with how heavy a fully watered hanging basket is, you will be able to tell when it’s time to water. If you happened to put your Geranium basket in an upright container, you can dip your index finger deeply into the soil.  If the soil is dry at about 1.5 inches, it’s time for a drink of water.  When watering containers and hanging baskets, water thoroughly so that water runs out of the bottom of the pot –  that’s how you know you have watered effectively and that all the roots are bathed in a fresh drink of water. If you don’t let water flow out, salts from the fertilizer will accumulate causing the leaves and flowers to burn.

 

  • Mixed Geraniums
  • Because Mixed Geranium baskets like the sun and heat, they need to be watched carefully for water requirements.  On average summer days, Mixed Geranium baskets need to be watered every 3 to 5 days but during very hot spells, they may need to be watered every 1-2 days.  Be sure to check the soil moisture or basket weight before you water.
  • Water thoroughly so the water drains out the bottom as described above.

 

 

Replenish Nutrients

 

  • This step is about fertilizing.  
  • The reason that replenishing nutrients is important for containers and hanging baskets is that there is a finite amount of nutrients held within the container soil and when the water drips out of the pots, some of those nutrients are lost.  We recommend fertilizing weekly.  Pick a regular day of the week, and make that your fertilizing day – make it an alarm on your phone.  Our favorite fertilizer is called ‘Nature’s Best’.  It is a natural fertilizer and we have found it to be easy to use, gentle on plants with no burning and we think it makes flowers brighter.  ‘Miracle Grow’ is another good choice and other balanced fertilizers like 20-20-20 work well.
  • Mixed Geraniums
  • Mixed Geranium baskets have a high rate of metabolism and they are heavy feeders.
  • Fertilize them weekly as you water.

 

 

Encourage Growth

  • This is a maintenance step.  
  • Plant growth is encouraged by taking off old flowers, known as deadheading, removing dead leaves, and pinching straggly, leggy plants back.  Taking off old flowers is important because the ultimate purpose of flowers to produce seeds for reproduction. By taking off those dead flowers, the plant continues to flower.  Old wilted and curled leaves actually take energy from the plant in an attempt to repair itself but if they are removed, the plant can continue to focus its efforts on flowering.  Plants can also get long and straggly looking – it’s ok to literally give them a haircut with scissors – it will make them branch, become bushy and thrive.
  • Mixed Geraniums
    • Deadhead Mixed Geraniums as their flowers begin to dry.  Follow the flower stem back to where it intersects with the larger stem and pinch it back at that point – Geraniums are fun because they make a very satisfying snapping noise when they flower stems are broken off.
    • In the Mixed Geranium baskets, some of the trailing flowers may need to be deadheaded as well.  If the trailers get too long for your liking, you may always cut them back with scissors to keep them stocky and strong and to stimulate fresh, compact growth.

Enjoy these baskets, they have tremendous color power and perform wonderfully with a little routine care.

How to Choose the Right Hanging Basket

Deciding on what kind of hanging basket to purchase can be positively confusing.  In this short video, we have some ideas for you on how to sort out the details about choosing a hanging basket.  It’s important to know the particulars of the location you wish to place it; like how many hours of sun it gets, how windy it is. It is our dream that this video will help make gardening simple, fun, and wildly successful for you!

 

Please check out https://www.wallishgreenhouses.ca/tips-on-choosing-the-right-hanging-basket-or-container/

 

Contact us today for more information

Solenia Begonia Hanging Basket CARE

What?? A Begonia for the sun??

Yes. It is true – we carry a fabulous sun tolerant Begonia series called ‘Solenia’ Begonias that grow well in the sun. These floriferous Begonias are available in a number of colors.  One thing to keep in mind, though, is that these Begonias are sun tolerant – they are not intended for the blistering hot sun. They do best in a northeast, east, southeast and northwest sun exposure location.  If they are placed in a hot south, southwest or direct west location they can get stressed from too much and burn.

 

It is best to grow Solenia Begonias in a sheltered area – their leaves are somewhat fragile and will get damaged or break in a windy area.

 

We will do a quick review of general hanging basket care using the acronym C-A-R-E and then we’ll take a look at Solenia Begonia hanging basket care specifically.

 

Check daily

  • This is about keeping a watchful eye on your hanging basket.
  • Each day, do a general top to bottom overall check of your hanging basket – inspect leaf & flower health: any curling, wilting, spotted or yellowing leaves, and old or deformed flowers. Turn the leaves over to look underneath for bugs, they love hiding there.
Solenia Begonias
  • Solenia Begonias are very hardy plants when they are in their sweet spot. When they are growing in areas that stress them, like in the hot sun, you see problems arise.
  • One thing to be very diligent about is to check for stem rot. If Solenia Begonias are kept too wet, their stems will rot at the soil level.  You can tell this by a yellowish-brown color where the soil and stem touch.  It will also be slimy at this area.

 

Adequate Hydration

  • This is all about watering.
  • A good way to check hanging baskets for adequate hydration is to feel how heavy they are, lift them by pushing up on their bottom as they are hanging and check the weight. As you get more familiar with how heavy a fully watered hanging basket is, you will be able to tell when it’s time to water. If you happened to put your begonia basket in an upright container, you can dip your index finger deeply into the soil.  If the soil is dry at about 1.5 inches, it’s time for a drink of water.  When watering containers and hanging baskets, water thoroughly so that water runs out of the bottom of the pot.  That is how you know you have watered effectively and that all the roots are bathed in a fresh drink of water. If you don’t let water flow out, salts from the fertilizer will accumulate causing the leaves and flowers to burn.
Solenia Begonias
  • Begonias die most often from being overwatered. Because Solenia Begonias live in sunny areas, their need for water is more than a shade Begonia but keep your eye on signs of overwatering. Depending on the weather, they may need to be watered gently every 2 or 3 days if it is hot but be sure to check the soil moisture or basket weight before you water.
  • Water thoroughly so the water drains out the bottom as described above.

Replenish Nutrients

  • This step is about fertilizing.
  • The reason that replenishing nutrients is important for containers and hanging baskets is that there is a finite amount of nutrients held within the container soil and when the water drips out of the pots, some of those nutrients are lost. We recommend fertilizing weekly.  Pick a regular day of the week, and make that your fertilizing day – make it an alarm on your phone.  Our favorite fertilizer is called ‘Nature’s Best’.  It is a natural fertilizer and we have found it to be easy to use, gentle on plants with no burning and we think it makes flowers brighter.  ‘Miracle Grow’ is another good choice and other balanced fertilizers like 20-20-20 work well.
Solenia Begonias
  • Fertilize Solenia Begonias on a weekly basis.

 

Encourage Growth

  • This is a maintenance step.
  • Growth of plants is encouraged by taking off old flowers, known as deadheading, removing dead leaves, and pinching straggly, leggy plants back. Taking off old flowers is important because the ultimate purpose of flowers to produce seeds for reproduction. By taking off those dead flowers, the plant continues to flower.  Old wilted and curled leaves actually take energy from the plant in an attempt to repair itself, but if they are removed, the plant can continue to focus its efforts on flowering.  Plants can also get long and straggly looking – it’s ok to literally give them a haircut with scissors – it will make them branch, become bushy and thrive.
Solenia Begonias
  • Deadhead Solenia Begonias as flowers begin to dry. Remove dead flowers and seed pods by following the stems back to where it intersects with the larger stem and pinch it back at that point.
  • Pinch stems back to encourage compact growth.
  • If the Sun Begonia basket is a mixed basket, some of the trailing flowers may need to be deadheaded as well.  If the vines get long, you can always cut them back with scissors to keep them stocky and strong.

 

Enjoy these baskets, they have tremendous color power and perform wonderfully with a little routine care.

 

Contact us today for more information

The Differences Between Annuals and Perennials

 

For the beginning gardener, putting the different pieces of the gardening puzzle together can be confusing. This blog will highlight the basic differences between annuals & perennials.

One thing both annuals and perennials have in common is that they both need to be planted in the right place – different annuals and perennials prefer sun or shady conditions.

 

Annuals:

  • are planted yearly, hence the name ‘annual’
  • die in the winter from exposure to cold
  • are prolific bloomers all season long
  • many require deadheading to continue blooming
  • work great in hanging baskets, planted containers, and flowerbeds with continual color

 

Perennials:

  • live through the winter as long as they have been planted in the correct horticultural zone, hence the name ‘perennial’ which actually means “lasting an indefinitely long time, recurring again and again” (Webster’s online dictionary)
  • have different life spans – perennials live anywhere from 3 years to over 70 years – and most land in the middle of the spectrum
  • generally have a season of bloom – either spring, summer, or fall
  • have a few players that bloom all season – the list is short:  Achillea, Campanula, Coreopsis, Echinacea, Gaillardia, Geranium, Rudbeckia, Pervoskia, Shasta Daisy, Stella D’Oro Daylily
  • have some application for hanging baskets and containers, but their season of bloom must be taken into account
  • must be planted in the ground to over winter in our Edmonton area