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Canadian Classic Plant: Saskatoons

Canadian Classic Plant:  Saskatoons

Sakatoons, the beloved native North American blueberry of the north, is one of the hallmark small fruits of our land.  It is hardy and easy to grow.  Amelanchier alnifolia – that’s its scientific name – resembles blueberries, belongs to the rose family and interestingly, is related to the apple family.  Saskatoons have a crazy hardiness range and are long lived.  These shrubs grow as tall as 15 feet can survive winter temperatures of -50 to -60C and they commonly live for 30 years. Some cultivars live as long as 70.

Saskatoons produce a deep purple, richly flavored berry.  These shrubs bloom with simple white flowers in early spring, sometimes so early that a late spring frost can damage their fruit setting, and berries begin the ripen in early to late July.  Like apples, saskatoons can be picked slightly unripe because they continue to ripen. The fresh berries are delicious all by themselves and they combine well with cream and ice-cream.  Saskatoon berries freeze and dry well and are very versatile, lending themselves to berry pies, tarts, scones, muffins, salads, salad dressings, and fruit leathers.  The berries are rich in vitamin C, antioxidants, fiber, and protein.

Saskatoons played a role in Canadian history and survival.  The berries, bark, roots, and leaves were used by the indigenous populations of Canada for many purposes ranging from nutritional (helped in the prevention of scurvy), to medicinal, and bow making.

Growing Tips:

Recommended Cultivars:

Look for varieties with a long track record of good performance. ‘Smoky’ is the most dependable and widely grown variety. ‘Martin’, ‘Thiessen’, ‘Honeywood’, and ‘Northline’ are good performers in Saskatchewan & Alberta. There are new cultivars out in the industry, but their track records have not yet been well established yet.

Growing Location

Saskatoons prefer a full sun location but they are shade tolerant.  When determining a location, remember that the more sun, the more productive they will be. They can be planted in the fall or in the spring. Saskatoons have broad soil tolerances but sandy loam is their favorite.  They don’t like poor draining clay soil because their roots will rot in the constantly wet environment.

Watering

Establish Saskatoon shrubs well by keeping them evenly moist.  Avoid letting them dry out or getting too wet. Once established, natural rainfall is all they need but keep in mind that if there is a drought, additional watering is recommended to help fruit.

Pruning

Saskatoons begin bearing fruit between 3-5 years of age. It has been found that 2-4 year old stalks have the best fruit production.  For the first 3 years, prune out dead, damaged or diseased branches.  After 3 years, thin braches to improve light diffusion and air movement.

For additional information, check out the sources cited below.

Sources:  http://saskatoonberryinstitute.org/saskatoons/, http://www.prairieberries.com/berry.php, https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/production/fruit-crops/saskatoon-berries.html

Garden Maintenance:  Why Deadhead?

 

Sam Llewelyn said “In gardens, beauty is a by-product. The main business is sex and death.”

 

…And there couldn’t be a truer statement. When flowers bloom, a complex series of events has started to perpetuate their species.  We gardeners get to enjoy the beautiful color displays and heady scents, which flowers are really sporting to attract pollinators. And what a joy it is to appreciate the blossoms!

 

Pollinators assist the flowers to produce seeds. Spent, old, and ugly blossoms are a step in the development of seeds.  It’s at this point where gardeners interfere with this whole process by taking off the old bloom and frustrating the plant in its ultimate goal. They then must continue to bloom.

 

You can deadhead with your fingers and pinch off the old blossoms, or you can use scissors or small shears.  Different flowers require different deadheading techniques, but to simplify things – cut the flower back to its nearest node – the spot down the stem where the next branch emerges.  Make sure you remove the seed pod(s) associated with the flower.  

 

If you would like to have seed production, just let the plants go.

 

Below is a list of annual flowers that do and do not require deadheading.

Table

 

Deer Proofing for Winter

There has to be few things more frustrating than watching deer munch your favorite shrubs all winter long.  Deer are attracted to tender shoots as a food source.  Although we can never stop deer completely, we can slow them down.  There are a few measures that can be taken in autumn to discourage browsing listed below:

Deer repellants

  • Homemade or commercial, have mixed success because deer become tolerant to the chemicals.  If using repellants, know they have to be rotated or changed up every 3 weeks or so.
  • Remember that repellants have to be reapplied after a snow or if the shrubs get wet.

Fencing

  • Fences are the most reliable method.
  • Fencing individual specimens you’d like to protect:
    • allows deer into the yard but protects plants you’d like to keep healthy
    • is less expensive than placing 7’ fencing around the entire yard.
    • also protects from more than just deer, think rabbits & porcupines.
  • For tall trees
    • Build the fence 4’ from the tree you’d like to protect, so the deer can’t just lean over & eat the branches.
    • Start the fence right next to the ground to prevent deer from crawling under it.
  • For shorter shrubs or plants
    • Build the fence a few feet higher than the plant so they can’t reach down and dine.
  • Check your fences weekly for weaknesses, so you can reinforce them if needed.
  • You may need to make the fences higher once packed snow accumulates.

Drain Pipes & Burlap]

  • Flexible drain pipes around tree trunks work as a good barrier for protecting them from being eaten
  • Wrapping shrubs in burlap also provide a physical barrier from being chewed.

Plant trees & shrubs they don’t like to eat such as barberries & lilacs.

Follow this link to Michigan state University Extension for a very comprehensive list of deer resistant plants:  http://www.ipm.msu.edu/uploads/files/deer_resistant_plants.pdf

Sources: http://news.psu.edu/story/182277/2008/10/29/protect-your-lawn-garden-deer-and-rabbits-winter, http://forestry.usu.edu/files/uploads/nr_ff/nr_ff_022.pdf

Mixed Sun and Petunia Hanging Basket C-A-R-E

Mixed Sun and Petunia hanging baskets come in a large variety of colors and are simple to care for.  They thrive in warm sunny locations.  The label ‘mixed’ means that different combinations of petunias have been paired with basket stuffers and vines that love the sun too.  They need a minimum of 6 hours of sunshine, but prefer at least 8.  If they are grown in the shade, they tend to stretch because they are searching for more light and they bloom less profusely.

 

Let’s do a quick review of general hanging basket care using the acronym C-A-R-E and then we will look at Mixed Sun and Petunia hanging baskets specifically.

Check daily

  • This is about keeping a watchful eye on your hanging basket.
  • Each day, do a general top to bottom overall check of your hanging basket – inspect leaf & flower health:  any curling, wilting, spotted or yellowing leaves, and old or deformed flowers. Turn the leaves over to look underneath for bugs, they love hiding there.
  • Mixed Sun and Petunia Hanging Baskets
    • Mixed Sun and Petunia baskets are very hardy when they are in the right location.  When they are grown in areas that stress them, like in the shade,   problems arise.  
    • Keep an eye on these baskets and check them regularly.  They have the potential to be a host for aphids. Aphids like petunias, that’s just a fact.  If that happens, regular applications of safer soap can help keep them at bay.  You may also make homemade aphid spray from recipes found on the internet. As a last resort you may need to use insecticides specifically for aphids such as Dr. Doom.

 

Adequate Hydration

    • This is all about watering.
    • A good way to check hanging baskets for adequate hydration is to feel how heavy they are, lift them by pushing up the bottom of the pot as they are hanging and check the weight.  As you get more familiar with how heavy a fully watered hanging basket is, you will be able to tell when it’s time to water. If you happened to put your basket in an upright container, you can dip your index finger deeply into the soil.  If the soil is dry at about 1.5 inches, it’s time for a drink of water.  Water thoroughly so that water runs out of the bottom of the pot. If you don’t let water flow out, salts from the fertilizer will accumulate causing the leaves and flowers to burn.

 

  • Mixed Sun and Petunia Hanging Baskets
  • Because Mixed Sun and Petunia baskets like the sun and heat, they need to be watched carefully for water requirements.  On average summer days, mixed sun baskets need to be watered every 2-4 days but during very hot spells, they may need to be watered daily.  Be sure to check the soil moisture or basket weight before you water.
  • Water thoroughly so the water drains out the bottom as described above.

 

 

 

Replenish Nutrients

 

  • This step is about fertilizing.  
  • Replenishing nutrients is important for containers and hanging baskets because there is a finite amount of nutrients held within the container soil and when the water drips out of the pots, some of those nutrients are lost.  We recommend fertilizing weekly for most hanging basket types.  Pick a regular day of the week, and make that your fertilizing day – make it an alarm on your phone.  Our favorite fertilizer is called ‘Nature’s Best’.  It is a natural fertilizer and we have found it to be easy to use, gentle on plants with no burning and we think it makes flowers brighter.  ‘Miracle Grow’ is another good choice and other balanced fertilizers (20-20-20) work well.
  • Mixed Sun and Petunia Hanging Baskets
  • Mixed Sun and Petunia baskets have a high rate of metabolism and they are heavy feeders.
  • Our recommendation for this category of baskets is different from general guidelines above.  We suggest that they are fertilized each time you water.

 

 

Encourage Growth

  • This is a maintenance step.  
  • Plant growth is encouraged by taking off old flowers, known as deadheading, removing dead leaves, and pinching straggly, leggy plants back.  Taking off old flowers is important because the ultimate purpose of flowers to produce seeds for reproduction. By taking off those dead flowers, the plant continues to flower.  Old wilted and curled leaves actually take energy from the plant in an attempt to repair itself but if they are removed, the plant can continue to focus its efforts on flowering.  Plants can also get long and straggly looking – it’s ok to literally give them a haircut with scissors – it will make them branch, become bushy and thrive.
  • Mixed Sun  and Petunia Hanging Baskets
    • Depending on what is in the mixed sun basket combo, you may or may not need to deadhead.  Most petunias really don’t need to be deadheaded, but if you prefer a tidier look, clip off the old petunia blossoms with scissors.
    • In these baskets, some of the trailing flowers or vines may need to be deadheaded as well.  Trailing verbena always does best if it is deadheaded.
    • If the petunias or trailers get too long for your liking, you may cut them back– it won’t heart them.  In fact,  it will keep them stocky and strong and stimulate compact fresh new growth.

 

Enjoy these baskets, they have tremendous color power and perform wonderfully with a little routine care.

Growing a Pollinator Garden

Growing a Pollinator Garden

 

Much has been in the news about creating garden environments that provide pollinators, especially bees, with plant accessibility.  Pollinators are not just bees and wasps, but include flies, moths, bats, hummingbirds, butterflies, and beetles. Their role in horticulture is critical for many reasons.  Why not plant your own pollinator garden?

 

Here are some things about pollinators:

 

  • Color preferences: Pollinators prefer bright colors: purples, yellows, whites
  • Pollinators love fragrant, single blooms
  • Gardens with varying blooming times give extended opportunities for pollinators to stick around. Perennials are a great way to make this happen because most of them have a season of bloom: spring, summer, and fall.
  • Be sure that your garden is pesticide free – pesticides kill pollinators, plain and simple. The internet is full of ideas that use home remedies to help with warding off garden pests that don’t interfere with pollinators.
  • Including a water feature in your garden creates an inviting environment for pollinators.
  • Deadhead old blooms so there are always fresh flowers available.

 

The chart below lists favorite annuals and perennials for pollinators.

 

Pollinator Chart
Annuals

 

Perennials

 

Spring Bloomers:

 

Summer Bloomers:

 

Fall Bloomers:

 

Fragrant Herbs:  Basil, Catnip, Marjoram,  Mint, Oregano, Lavender, Rosemary, Thyme Allium

Anemone (Pasque Flower)

Coreopsis (Tickseed)

Delphinium

Echinacea (Cone Flower)

Iris

Hellebore

Phlox subulata

Primula

Creeping Thyme

Agastache (Giant Hyssop)

Asclepias (Butterfly Weed)

Alcea (Hollyhock)

Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed)

Gaillardia

Globe Thistle

Salvia

Heliopsis (False Sunflower)

Heuchera (Coral Bells)

Leucanthemum (Shasta Daisy)

Lily

Monarda (Bee Balm)

Papaver

 

Aster

Liatris (Purple Gay Feather)

Tall Fall Blooming Sedum

Solidago (Goldenrod)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

               

Annuals:

Alyssum                 Asters

Calendula             Cleome

Cosmos

Evening Scented Stocks

Geranium            Gladiola

Lantana             Marigolds

Mirabilis (4 O’Clocks)

Nasturtium          Nemesia

Phlox               Rudbeckia

Stocks              Sunflower

Verbena                  Zinnia

Veggies:

Cucumber, Pumpkin, Tomatoes

 

Sources: 

www.kidsgardening.org, http://www.natureconservancy.ca/en/blog/my-native-species-bring-all.html?referrer=https://www.google.ca/#.WHP_YlMrKUk

http://millionpollinatorgardens.org/, http://www.gardenontario.org/

Trailing Geranium Hanging Basket C-A-R-E

Trailing Geranium hanging baskets are the hardiest of all hanging baskets.  They come in a large variety of colors and kinds.  Included in this set of baskets are the Ivy, Cascade, Calliope, Caliente and Minicascade series. All Geraniums thrive in warm sunny location but Trailing Geraniums in particular handle the summer heat best.  They need a minimum of 6 hours of sunshine, but prefer at least 8; so east, south and west locations are the best.  If they are grown in shade, they tend to stretch because they are searching for light and they bloom poorly.  Of all the hanging basket types we grow, Trailing Geraniums are the easiest to care for.  A bonus to Trailing Geraniums is that they can handle  wind well.

A fun thing about Trailing Geraniums, is that hummingbirds are attracted to certain varieties, especially Cascade & Minicascade.

Let’s do a quick review of general hanging basket care using the acronym C-A-R-E and then we will take a look specifically at Trailing Geranium hanging baskets.

Check daily

  • This is about keeping a watchful eye on your hanging basket.
  • Each day, do a general top to bottom overall check of your hanging basket – inspect leaf & flower health:  any curling, wilting, spotted or yellowing leaves, and old or deformed flowers. Turn the leaves over to look underneath for bugs, they love hiding there.
  • Trailing Geraniums
    • Geraniums are very hardy plants when they are in the right location.  They are host to very few diseases or pests.  Problems arise when they are grown in areas that stress them (like in the shade).

Adequate Hydration

  • This is all about watering.
  • A good way to check hanging baskets for adequate hydration is to feel how heavy they are, lift them by pushing up on the bottom of the pot as they are hanging and check the weight.  As you get more familiar with how heavy a fully watered hanging basket is, you will be able to tell when it’s time to water. If you happened to put your begonia basket in an upright container, you can dip your index finger deeply into the soil.  If the soil is dry at about 1.5 inches, it’s time for a drink of water.  Water thoroughly so that water runs out of the bottom of the pot. If you don’t let water flow out, salts from the fertilizer will accumulate causing the leaves and flowers to burn.
  • Trailing Geraniums
    • Because Trailing Geraniums baskets like the sun and heat, they need to be watched carefully for water requirements.  On average summer days, Trailing Geranium baskets need to be watered every 3 to 5 days but during very hot spells, they may need to be watered every 2 days.  Be sure to check the soil moisture or basket weight before you water.
    • Water thoroughly so the water drains out the bottom as described above.

Replenish Nutrients

  • This step is about fertilizing.
  • Replenishing nutrients is important for containers and hanging baskets because there is a finite amount of nutrients held within the soil and when the water drips out of the pots, some of those nutrients are lost.  We recommend fertilizing weekly for most container types.  Pick a regular day of the week, and make that your fertilizing day – make it an alarm on your phone.  Our favorite fertilizer is called ‘Nature’s Best’.  It is a natural fertilizer and we have found it to be easy to use, gentle on plants with no burning and we think it makes flowers brighter.  ‘Miracle Grow’ is another good choice and other balanced fertilizers (20-20-20) work well.
  • Trailing Geraniums
    • Trailing Geranium baskets have a high rate of metabolism and they are heavy feeders.
    • Our fertilization recommendation is somewhat different for Trailing Geraniums – we suggest fertilizing each watering as opposed to once weekly as indicated above.

Encourage Growth

  • This is a maintenance step.
  • Plant growth is encouraged by taking off old flowers, known as deadheading, removing dead leaves, and pinching straggly, leggy plants back.  Taking off old flowers is important because the ultimate purpose of flowers to produce seeds for reproduction. By taking off those dead flowers, the plant continues to flower.  Old wilted and curled leaves actually take energy from the plant in an attempt to repair itself but if they are removed, the plant can continue to focus its efforts on flowering.  Plants can also get long and straggly looking – it’s ok to literally give them a haircut with scissors – it will make them branch, become bushy and thrive.
  • Trailing Geraniums
    • Deadhead Trailing Geraniums as their flowers begin to dry.  Follow the flower stem back to where it intersects with the larger stem and pinch it back at that point – Geraniums are fun because they make a very satisfying snapping noise when their flower stems are taken off.
    • If they get a little long or lopsided, take a pair of scissors and shape them up.  The pruning won’t hurt them; they’ll actually grow better with fresh and compact growth.

Enjoy these baskets, they have tremendous color power and perform wonderfully with a little routine care – and we hope you get a visit from a hummingbird or two!

Peony Cut Flowers

Peony Cut Flowers

 

Peonies, one of the hardiest and easy to grow perennials, bloom in the spring. Peonies make wonderful romantic fragrant cut flowers.  Here are some guidelines for success:

  • Always work with clean tools – clean shears, clean vases.  Make it a habit to keep your garden tools and vases washed with warm soapy water.  Clean tools and vases keep bacterial growth at bay and gardens healthier.

 

  • Always cut fresh flowers first thing in the morning – they are well hydrated from the previous night’s rest and they are fresh and cool.

 

  • Avoid picking Peony blossoms in the first and second year of the plant’s growth.  Deadhead the old blossoms on young plants so seed pods don’t form – that way the peony can devote its energy to growing robust, healthy roots.

 

  • Pick buds at the ‘marshmallow phase’ – give the peony buds a gentle squeeze and when they feel like a marshmallow, it’s time to pick them.  Another way of gauging when to pick is when you see the first flower petal beginning to emerge from the bud.  If the bud feels hard like a marble, they may not open because the buds are too tight.  Cut single peony blooms tighter than you would double peony blossoms – the doubles just have more mass.
  • A fully open bloom with fall apart quickly as a cut flower.
  • Cut stems at a 45º angle – this optimizes the surface area for water uptake.  If possible, trim stems underwater to keep the stem bottoms well hydrated.
  • Changing the water in the vase daily and keeping leaves out of the water will help to keep bacterial counts down.
  • Timing peony blossoms for an event – follow the above procedure, and store them in the refrigerator – optimal temperature is around 34F (2-4C)
  • keep them in the fridge for up to 4 weeks but the longer they stay in the fridge, the faster they will open and the shorter they will last
  • they can be stored in water or wrapped in damp paper towels to keep them fresh
  • 2 or 3 days before the event, take them out of the fridge, give their stems a fresh cut and place them in lukewarm water to wake them up

 

 

Sources:  http://passion4peonies.blogspot.ca/2010/08/peonies-as-cut-flowers.html, http://peonyparadise.com/cutflowercare.aspx, http://borealfarms.net/cuttingandstoringpeonyblossoms/

Sunpatiens Hanging Basket C-A-R-E

The words ‘Sun’ & ‘Impatiens’ seem not to work together but a new breed of Impatiens is out!

We carry a fabulous sun-tolerant Impatiens series and they are easy to care for.  Sunpatiens bloom profusely and are available in bright colors.  Sun Impatiens like the sun, although it’s a good idea to not put them in the blistering hot sun.  They do best in a northeast, east, southeast, south (if it’s not crazy hot) and northwest sun exposure location.  If they are placed in a hot south, southwest or direct west location they can get stressed and burn.

 

We will do a quick review of general hanging basket care using the acronym C-A-R-E and then we’ll take a look at Sun Impatiens hanging basket care specifically.

Check daily

  • This is about keeping a watchful eye on your hanging basket.
  • Each day, do a general top to bottom overall check of your hanging basket – inspect leaf & flower health:  any curling, wilting, spotted or yellowing leaves, and old or deformed flowers. Turn the leaves over to look underneath for bugs, they love hiding there.
  • Sunpatiens
    • Sun Impatiens are quite hardy plants when they are in the correct location.  When they are growing in areas that stress them (like in the really hot sun), that is when problems arise.  

 

Adequate Hydration

    • This is all about watering.
    • A good way to check hanging baskets for adequate hydration is to feel how heavy they are, lift them by pushing up on the bottom of the pot as they are hanging and check the weight.  As you get more familiar with how heavy a fully watered hanging basket is, you will be able to tell when it’s time to water. If you happened to put your Sunpatiens basket in an upright container, you can dip your index finger deeply into the soil.  If the soil is dry at about 1.5 inches, it’s time for a drink of water.  When watering containers and hanging baskets, water thoroughly so that water runs out of the bottom of the pot.  If you don’t let water flow out, salts from the fertilizer will accumulate causing the leaves and flowers to burn.
    • Sunpatiens

 

  • Because Sun Impatiens live in sunny areas, they have a steady need for water.  Depending on the weather, they may need to be watered every 1 to 3 days if it is hot but be sure to check the soil moisture or basket weight before you water.
  • Water thoroughly so the water drains out the bottom as described above.
  • The day may come when they accidentally become so wilted that you think they’re dead –  but what’s so amazing about this plant is that most of the time they will recover and look fabulous again.

 

 

Replenish Nutrients

 

  • This step is about fertilizing.  
  • Replenishing nutrients is important for containers and hanging baskets because there is a finite amount of nutrients held within the soil and when the water drips out of the pots, some of those nutrients are lost.  We recommend fertilizing weekly.  Pick a regular day of the week, and make that your fertilizing day – make it an alarm on your phone.  Our favorite fertilizer is called ‘Nature’s Best’.  It is a natural fertilizer and we have found it to be easy to use, gentle on plants with no burning and we think it makes flowers brighter.  ‘Miracle Grow’ is another good choice and other balanced fertilizers like 20-20-20 work well.

 

    • Sunpatiens

 

  • Fertilize Sun Impatiens on a weekly basis.

 

 

Encourage Growth

  • This is a maintenance step.  
  • Plant growth is encouraged by taking off old flowers, known as deadheading, removing dead leaves, and pinching straggly, leggy plants back.  Taking off old flowers is important because the ultimate purpose of flowers to produce seeds for reproduction. By taking off those dead flowers, the plant continues to flower.  Old wilted and curled leaves actually take energy from the plant in an attempt to repair itself but if they are removed, the plant can continue to focus its efforts on flowering.  Plants can also get long and straggly looking – it’s ok to literally give them a haircut with scissors – it will make them branch, become bushy and thrive.
  • Sunpatiens
    • Sun Impatiens don’t need to be deadheaded because they are self-cleaning.  Just give the baskets or the plants a shake and the dead blossoms will fall right off.
    • If they get a little straggly or lopsided, just pinch them back a bit – it will stimulate fresh compact and they will continue to thicken up and thrive.

 

Enjoy these baskets, they have tremendous color power and perform wonderfully with a little routine care.

Unwinding the Fertilizer Numbers

Fertilizer can be confusing.  The sheer quantity of brands and mathematical combinations can be dizzying.  Let’s spend some time unwinding fertilizer and hopefully, the numbers will begin to make sense.

 

Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and K – Potassium (aka Potash) are the 3 major nutrients or macronutrients contained in fertilizer required for plant growth.  They are the 3 numbers you see on fertilizer labels.  These numbers represent the percentage of each macronutrient in the specific fertilizer. So if you see a label saying 20-20-20, it contains approximately 20% nitrogen, 20% phosphorus, and 20% potassium.  The numbers aren’t adding up?  The remaining percentage is made up of a smaller amount of nutrients known as micronutrients and fillers.  The fillers help you the fertilizer spread evenly.

 

Joe Lamp’l of Growing a Greener World has come up with a great way to describe the functions of N, P, & K – just remember:  Up, Down, & All Around.

 

N nitrogenUP – think ‘up’ or top growth

  • nitrogen promotes green leafy growth
  • healthy leaves mean a better-equipped system to provide food for the plant
  • If you see a fertilizer with numbers like 30-0-3 – that would be great for a lawn because this fertilizer is all about green top growth.

 

P phosphorus – DOWNthink ‘down’ or root development

  • phosphorous promotes root development and flowering
  • flowering means the amount of flowers and size of blossoms
  • For ‘root boosting’ fertilizer, it is common to see combinations like these: 10-52-10 or  5-15-5
  • A common ‘flowering’ fertilizer combination is 13-30-15

 

Kpotassium – ALL AROUND think good health in general

  • potassium promotes overall health: guards against disease, aids in drought and cold tolerance, cell wall strength & maintenance
  • Potassium also enhances fruit & vegetable flavor & development
  • Vegetable fertilizers are rather conservative in and look like this:  7-4-5, 2-7-4

 

Our favorite fertilizer and the one that we use is called “Nature’s Best”.  It’s a natural fertilizer and we find it easy to use, gentle on plants with no burning leaf tips, and we think it makes flowers brighter.  ‘Miracle Grow’ is another good choice and other balanced fertilizers like 20-20-20 work well.
Hope that helps!

Vlog:  Hanging Basket C-A-R-E


Hanging baskets live & die by the care we give them and some days that sounds like a scary proposition.  The very first thing to successful hanging basket care is to have the right hanging basket paired with the right location.  And beyond that, the reality is that hanging baskets are not that complicated to care for.  We are hoping that in this short video you will discover some of our secrets to caring for hanging baskets using the acronym C-A-R-E.  It is our hope that this video will help make gardening simple, fun, and wildly successful for you!

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